Bruce Gourley: Grand Prize Winner of the 2014 Yellowstone Park Foundation "Capturing Wonderland" Photo Contest


Pictured above is Bruce's grand prize winning image in the 2014 Yellowstone Park Foundation's "Capturing Wonderland" photo contest. Nearly 1,200 entries were judged by renowned nature photographer Tom Murphy, who selected Bruce's image of a dramatic eruption of Yellowstone's Beehive Geyser, entitled "Beehive Shower in Black and White," as the grand prize winner.

The photo is available for sale as a framed print, canvas wrap and in greeting cards set from Fine Art America.

Following is an interview with Bruce from the Yellowstone Park Foundation website:

Q. Tell us a little about your winning photo.

A. Early one overcast morning in June of this year, I turned onto the drive leading to the Old Faithful Inn parking lot, as I have hundreds of times over the years. But that morning a spectacular site greeted me, a sight I had never seen before. Beehive was erupting in all her glory, which I had seen many times previously. Yet at that moment the wind was blowing firmly to the west, and the view from my distant vantage point on a small rise was dramatic. Sheets of wind-carried spray were cascading westward, forming a misty veil that made a line of lodgepoles in the foreground stand out in stark contrast. Two people, the size of ants compared to Beehive's column of water, were silhouetted in the spray-free area immediately to the right of the cone, and one to the left was barely visible through the misty veil. Throughout the scene, thick clouds of steam from other thermal features were splayed around. Always having my camera nearby, I parked my car, jumped out, and began shooting. Reviewing my photos later in the day, I realized what a truly great shot I had happened upon, the product of lucky timing. The iconic nature of the photo led me to process it in black and white, for an even more dramatic effect.

Q. What is your experience in Yellowstone National Park?

A. Growing up in Douglas, Georgia in south Georgia (the "other" Georgia), I spent much of my early years fishing and hunting and just spending time in the outdoors. As a college student, I first visited Yellowstone in 1987 while working in Wyoming that summer, and immediately fell in love with the Park. I worked in Cody the next summer, frequenting the Park. A few years later my wife and I moved to Billings, and later to the Bozeman area to be closer to Yellowstone. A stroke of good fortune took place in 1997 when I was able to obtain the domain name, yellowstone.net. I originally created the Yellowstone Net site as a hobby, but it soon grew beyond that; currently it is an advertising platform for the Yellowstone region and an online community for the Yellowstone public. Photographer Russ Finley -- whose videos and calendars are available in many national park gift shops -- is the designer of the current incarnation of Yellowstone Net. Aside from my various jobs, I spend as much time as possible outdoors. From May to October, I'm in the Park weekly, camera in hand. The wildness and variety I never tire of, whether on a trail (I've hiked most of the Park's trails over the years) or from the roadside. And I've enjoyed getting to know so many people over time -- rangers, concessionaire employees, photographers, wolf watchers, geyser gazers, and others.

Q. What is your favorite subject to photograph?

A. I guess landscapes have always been my favorite subject, in general. While photographing wildlife can be exciting, I enjoy looking for art in nature's landscapes. Yellowstone is my favorite place to photograph, but there are other parks, national and state, that I frequent as well, including Glacier National Park, Grand Teton National Park, and Jekyll Island State Park off the coast of Georgia.

Q. How long have you had an interest in photography?

A. I began dabbling in photography in high school, before the advent of digital cameras, and won several ribbons at the county fair. But during college I focused on my studies, and afterwards on other things, until digital cameras came of age, quality-wise, in the early 2000s. I purchased my first DSLR in 2005, and have been avidly photographing since then, especially in Yellowstone. Photography is now a nice avocation, and I continue trying to expand my knowledge and skills thereof. My portfolio can be accessed at brucegourley.com/photography.

- See more at: http://www.ypf.org/site/News2?page=NewsArticle&id=6824#sthash.CalO1fSU.dpuf

Q. Tell us a little about your winning photo.

A. Early one overcast morning in June of this year, I turned onto the drive leading to the Old Faithful Inn parking lot, as I have hundreds of times over the years. But that morning a spectacular site greeted me, a sight I had never seen before. Beehive was erupting in all her glory, which I had seen many times previously. Yet at that moment the wind was blowing firmly to the west, and the view from my distant vantage point on a small rise was dramatic. Sheets of wind-carried spray were cascading westward, forming a misty veil that made a line of lodgepoles in the foreground stand out in stark contrast. Two people, the size of ants compared to Beehive's column of water, were silhouetted in the spray-free area immediately to the right of the cone, and one to the left was barely visible through the misty veil. Throughout the scene, thick clouds of steam from other thermal features were splayed around. Always having my camera nearby, I parked my car, jumped out, and began shooting. Reviewing my photos later in the day, I realized what a truly great shot I had happened upon, the product of lucky timing. The iconic nature of the photo led me to process it in black and white, for an even more dramatic effect.

Q. What is your experience in Yellowstone National Park?

A. Growing up in Douglas, Georgia in south Georgia (the "other" Georgia), I spent much of my early years fishing and hunting and just spending time in the outdoors. As a college student, I first visited Yellowstone in 1987 while working in Wyoming that summer, and immediately fell in love with the Park. I worked in Cody the next summer, frequenting the Park. A few years later my wife and I moved to Billings, and later to the Bozeman area to be closer to Yellowstone. A stroke of good fortune took place in 1997 when I was able to obtain the domain name, yellowstone.net. I originally created the Yellowstone Net site as a hobby, but it soon grew beyond that; currently it is an advertising platform for the Yellowstone region and an online community for the Yellowstone public. Photographer Russ Finley -- whose videos and calendars are available in many national park gift shops -- is the designer of the current incarnation of Yellowstone Net. Aside from my various jobs, I spend as much time as possible outdoors. From May to October, I'm in the Park weekly, camera in hand. The wildness and variety I never tire of, whether on a trail (I've hiked most of the Park's trails over the years) or from the roadside. And I've enjoyed getting to know so many people over time -- rangers, concessionaire employees, photographers, wolf watchers, geyser gazers, and others.

Q. What is your favorite subject to photograph?

A. I guess landscapes have always been my favorite subject, in general. While photographing wildlife can be exciting, I enjoy looking for art in nature's landscapes. Yellowstone is my favorite place to photograph, but there are other parks, national and state, that I frequent as well, including Glacier National Park, Grand Teton National Park, and Jekyll Island State Park off the coast of Georgia.

Q. How long have you had an interest in photography?

A. I began dabbling in photography in high school, before the advent of digital cameras, and won several ribbons at the county fair. But during college I focused on my studies, and afterwards on other things, until digital cameras came of age, quality-wise, in the early 2000s. I purchased my first DSLR in 2005, and have been avidly photographing since then, especially in Yellowstone. Photography is now a nice avocation, and I continue trying to expand my knowledge and skills thereof. My portfolio can be accessed at brucegourley.com/photography.

- See more at: http://www.ypf.org/site/News2?page=NewsArticle&id=6824#sthash.CalO1fSU.dpuf

Q. Tell us a little about your winning photo.

A. Early one overcast morning in June of this year, I turned onto the drive leading to the Old Faithful Inn parking lot, as I have hundreds of times over the years. But that morning a spectacular site greeted me, a sight I had never seen before. Beehive was erupting in all her glory, which I had seen many times previously. Yet at that moment the wind was blowing firmly to the west, and the view from my distant vantage point on a small rise was dramatic. Sheets of wind-carried spray were cascading westward, forming a misty veil that made a line of lodgepoles in the foreground stand out in stark contrast. Two people, the size of ants compared to Beehive's column of water, were silhouetted in the spray-free area immediately to the right of the cone, and one to the left was barely visible through the misty veil. Throughout the scene, thick clouds of steam from other thermal features were splayed around. Always having my camera nearby, I parked my car, jumped out, and began shooting. Reviewing my photos later in the day, I realized what a truly great shot I had happened upon, the product of lucky timing. The iconic nature of the photo led me to process it in black and white, for an even more dramatic effect.

Q. What is your experience in Yellowstone National Park?

A. Growing up in Douglas, Georgia in south Georgia (the "other" Georgia), I spent much of my early years fishing and hunting and just spending time in the outdoors. As a college student, I first visited Yellowstone in 1987 while working in Wyoming that summer, and immediately fell in love with the Park. I worked in Cody the next summer, frequenting the Park. A few years later my wife and I moved to Billings, and later to the Bozeman area to be closer to Yellowstone. A stroke of good fortune took place in 1997 when I was able to obtain the domain name, yellowstone.net. I originally created the Yellowstone Net site as a hobby, but it soon grew beyond that; currently it is an advertising platform for the Yellowstone region and an online community for the Yellowstone public. Photographer Russ Finley -- whose videos and calendars are available in many national park gift shops -- is the designer of the current incarnation of Yellowstone Net. Aside from my various jobs, I spend as much time as possible outdoors. From May to October, I'm in the Park weekly, camera in hand. The wildness and variety I never tire of, whether on a trail (I've hiked most of the Park's trails over the years) or from the roadside. And I've enjoyed getting to know so many people over time -- rangers, concessionaire employees, photographers, wolf watchers, geyser gazers, and others.

Q. What is your favorite subject to photograph?

A. I guess landscapes have always been my favorite subject, in general. While photographing wildlife can be exciting, I enjoy looking for art in nature's landscapes. Yellowstone is my favorite place to photograph, but there are other parks, national and state, that I frequent as well, including Glacier National Park, Grand Teton National Park, and Jekyll Island State Park off the coast of Georgia.

Q. How long have you had an interest in photography?

A. I began dabbling in photography in high school, before the advent of digital cameras, and won several ribbons at the county fair. But during college I focused on my studies, and afterwards on other things, until digital cameras came of age, quality-wise, in the early 2000s. I purchased my first DSLR in 2005, and have been avidly photographing since then, especially in Yellowstone. Photography is now a nice avocation, and I continue trying to expand my knowledge and skills thereof. My portfolio can be accessed at brucegourley.com/photography.

- See more at: http://www.ypf.org/site/News2?page=NewsArticle&id=6824#sthash.bXSDOqHI.dpuf

Q. Tell us a little about your winning photo.

A. Early one overcast morning in June of this year, I turned onto the drive leading to the Old Faithful Inn parking lot, as I have hundreds of times over the years. But that morning a spectacular site greeted me, a sight I had never seen before. Beehive was erupting in all her glory, which I had seen many times previously. Yet at that moment the wind was blowing firmly to the west, and the view from my distant vantage point on a small rise was dramatic. Sheets of wind-carried spray were cascading westward, forming a misty veil that made a line of lodgepoles in the foreground stand out in stark contrast. Two people, the size of ants compared to Beehive's column of water, were silhouetted in the spray-free area immediately to the right of the cone, and one to the left was barely visible through the misty veil. Throughout the scene, thick clouds of steam from other thermal features were splayed around. Always having my camera nearby, I parked my car, jumped out, and began shooting. Reviewing my photos later in the day, I realized what a truly great shot I had happened upon, the product of lucky timing. The iconic nature of the photo led me to process it in black and white, for an even more dramatic effect.

Q. What is your experience in Yellowstone National Park?

A. Growing up in Douglas, Georgia in south Georgia (the "other" Georgia), I spent much of my early years fishing and hunting and just spending time in the outdoors. As a college student, I first visited Yellowstone in 1987 while working in Wyoming that summer, and immediately fell in love with the Park. I worked in Cody the next summer, frequenting the Park. A few years later my wife and I moved to Billings, and later to the Bozeman area to be closer to Yellowstone. A stroke of good fortune took place in 1997 when I was able to obtain the domain name, yellowstone.net. I originally created the Yellowstone Net site as a hobby, but it soon grew beyond that; currently it is an advertising platform for the Yellowstone region and an online community for the Yellowstone public. Photographer Russ Finley -- whose videos and calendars are available in many national park gift shops -- is the designer of the current incarnation of Yellowstone Net. Aside from my various jobs, I spend as much time as possible outdoors. From May to October, I'm in the Park weekly, camera in hand. The wildness and variety I never tire of, whether on a trail (I've hiked most of the Park's trails over the years) or from the roadside. And I've enjoyed getting to know so many people over time -- rangers, concessionaire employees, photographers, wolf watchers, geyser gazers, and others.

Q. What is your favorite subject to photograph?

A. I guess landscapes have always been my favorite subject, in general. While photographing wildlife can be exciting, I enjoy looking for art in nature's landscapes. Yellowstone is my favorite place to photograph, but there are other parks, national and state, that I frequent as well, including Glacier National Park, Grand Teton National Park, and Jekyll Island State Park off the coast of Georgia.

Q. How long have you had an interest in photography?

A. I began dabbling in photography in high school, before the advent of digital cameras, and won several ribbons at the county fair. But during college I focused on my studies, and afterwards on other things, until digital cameras came of age, quality-wise, in the early 2000s. I purchased my first DSLR in 2005, and have been avidly photographing since then, especially in Yellowstone. Photography is now a nice avocation, and I continue trying to expand my knowledge and skills thereof. My portfolio can be accessed at brucegourley.com/photography.

- See more at: http://www.ypf.org/site/News2?page=NewsArticle&id=6824#sthash.bXSDOqHI.dpuf

Q. Tell us a little about your winning photo.

A. Early one overcast morning in June of this year, I turned onto the drive leading to the Old Faithful Inn parking lot, as I have hundreds of times over the years. But that morning a spectacular site greeted me, a sight I had never seen before. Beehive was erupting in all her glory, which I had seen many times previously. Yet at that moment the wind was blowing firmly to the west, and the view from my distant vantage point on a small rise was dramatic. Sheets of wind-carried spray were cascading westward, forming a misty veil that made a line of lodgepoles in the foreground stand out in stark contrast. Two people, the size of ants compared to Beehive's column of water, were silhouetted in the spray-free area immediately to the right of the cone, and one to the left was barely visible through the misty veil. Throughout the scene, thick clouds of steam from other thermal features were splayed around. Always having my camera nearby, I parked my car, jumped out, and began shooting. Reviewing my photos later in the day, I realized what a truly great shot I had happened upon, the product of lucky timing. The iconic nature of the photo led me to process it in black and white, for an even more dramatic effect.

Q. What is your experience in Yellowstone National Park?

A. Growing up in Douglas, Georgia in south Georgia (the "other" Georgia), I spent much of my early years fishing and hunting and just spending time in the outdoors. As a college student, I first visited Yellowstone in 1987 while working in Wyoming that summer, and immediately fell in love with the Park. I worked in Cody the next summer, frequenting the Park. A few years later my wife and I moved to Billings, and later to the Bozeman area to be closer to Yellowstone. A stroke of good fortune took place in 1997 when I was able to obtain the domain name, yellowstone.net. I originally created the Yellowstone Net site as a hobby, but it soon grew beyond that; currently it is an advertising platform for the Yellowstone region and an online community for the Yellowstone public. Photographer Russ Finley -- whose videos and calendars are available in many national park gift shops -- is the designer of the current incarnation of Yellowstone Net. Aside from my various jobs, I spend as much time as possible outdoors. From May to October, I'm in the Park weekly, camera in hand. The wildness and variety I never tire of, whether on a trail (I've hiked most of the Park's trails over the years) or from the roadside. And I've enjoyed getting to know so many people over time -- rangers, concessionaire employees, photographers, wolf watchers, geyser gazers, and others.

Q. What is your favorite subject to photograph?

A. I guess landscapes have always been my favorite subject, in general. While photographing wildlife can be exciting, I enjoy looking for art in nature's landscapes. Yellowstone is my favorite place to photograph, but there are other parks, national and state, that I frequent as well, including Glacier National Park, Grand Teton National Park, and Jekyll Island State Park off the coast of Georgia.

Q. How long have you had an interest in photography?

A. I began dabbling in photography in high school, before the advent of digital cameras, and won several ribbons at the county fair. But during college I focused on my studies, and afterwards on other things, until digital cameras came of age, quality-wise, in the early 2000s. I purchased my first DSLR in 2005, and have been avidly photographing since then, especially in Yellowstone. Photography is now a nice avocation, and I continue trying to expand my knowledge and skills thereof. My portfolio can be accessed at brucegourley.com/photography.

- See more at: http://www.ypf.org/site/News2?page=NewsArticle&id=6824#sthash.bXSDOqHI.dpuf

Q. Tell us a little about your winning photo.

A. Early one overcast morning in June of this year, I turned onto the drive leading to the Old Faithful Inn parking lot, as I have hundreds of times over the years. But that morning a spectacular site greeted me, a sight I had never seen before. Beehive was erupting in all her glory, which I had seen many times previously. Yet at that moment the wind was blowing firmly to the west, and the view from my distant vantage point on a small rise was dramatic. Sheets of wind-carried spray were cascading westward, forming a misty veil that made a line of lodgepoles in the foreground stand out in stark contrast. Two people, the size of ants compared to Beehive's column of water, were silhouetted in the spray-free area immediately to the right of the cone, and one to the left was barely visible through the misty veil. Throughout the scene, thick clouds of steam from other thermal features were splayed around. Always having my camera nearby, I parked my car, jumped out, and began shooting. Reviewing my photos later in the day, I realized what a truly great shot I had happened upon, the product of lucky timing. The iconic nature of the photo led me to process it in black and white, for an even more dramatic effect.

Q. What is your experience in Yellowstone National Park?

A. Growing up in Douglas, Georgia in south Georgia (the "other" Georgia), I spent much of my early years fishing and hunting and just spending time in the outdoors. As a college student, I first visited Yellowstone in 1987 while working in Wyoming that summer, and immediately fell in love with the Park. I worked in Cody the next summer, frequenting the Park. A few years later my wife and I moved to Billings, and later to the Bozeman area to be closer to Yellowstone. A stroke of good fortune took place in 1997 when I was able to obtain the domain name, yellowstone.net. I originally created the Yellowstone Net site as a hobby, but it soon grew beyond that; currently it is an advertising platform for the Yellowstone region and an online community for the Yellowstone public. Photographer Russ Finley -- whose videos and calendars are available in many national park gift shops -- is the designer of the current incarnation of Yellowstone Net. Aside from my various jobs, I spend as much time as possible outdoors. From May to October, I'm in the Park weekly, camera in hand. The wildness and variety I never tire of, whether on a trail (I've hiked most of the Park's trails over the years) or from the roadside. And I've enjoyed getting to know so many people over time -- rangers, concessionaire employees, photographers, wolf watchers, geyser gazers, and others.

Q. What is your favorite subject to photograph?

A. I guess landscapes have always been my favorite subject, in general. While photographing wildlife can be exciting, I enjoy looking for art in nature's landscapes. Yellowstone is my favorite place to photograph, but there are other parks, national and state, that I frequent as well, including Glacier National Park, Grand Teton National Park, and Jekyll Island State Park off the coast of Georgia.

Q. How long have you had an interest in photography?

A. I began dabbling in photography in high school, before the advent of digital cameras, and won several ribbons at the county fair. But during college I focused on my studies, and afterwards on other things, until digital cameras came of age, quality-wise, in the early 2000s. I purchased my first DSLR in 2005, and have been avidly photographing since then, especially in Yellowstone. Photography is now a nice avocation, and I continue trying to expand my knowledge and skills thereof. My portfolio can be accessed at brucegourley.com/photography.

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MORE INFORMATION

"Bruce Gourley Selected as Grand Prize Winner of the 2014 Yellowstone Park Foundation Photo Contest" (Fine Art America Press Release) -- August 6, 2014

"Annual Capturing Wonderland Photo Contest 2014 Winners" (Yellowstone Park Foundation) -- August 1, 2014